Many plot holders have contacted us querying whether they can go up to their plot while on lockdown. In short, yes visiting your plot can count as your daily exercise session as recommended by the government.

Of course you need to continue to keep the social distancing rules of 2 meters and keep up with the increased hygiene measures. Use hand sanitizer when you’re able to, and the water on-site is switched on, and although it’s cold water, used with anti-bacterial hand wash will allow you to keep yourself as protected as possible.

The on-site toilet will be closed until further notice, as are any communal facilities like the shop.

If you are waiting to let a plot, then you’ve not been forgotten, but for obvious reasons, no plot letting will happen on the site until further notice and the council won’t accept any new applications to let a  plot. But those already on the waiting list, your position will be held until we pick up our normal letting duties sometime in the future.

The National Allotment Society has provided some brilliant, detailed guidance here.

Please keep safe, and please adhere to the rules, as the last thing we want during times like this is for access to the allotments to be taken away from us.

Any gardener or allotment plot holder will confirm, unsurprisingly, that water is an essential ingredient for all crops, and at Colchester Avenue allotments, we’re lucky to have a supply of running water. But this resource doesn’t come for free, and because we have access to a mains water supply doesn’t mean we should take advantage of this and not put any effort into conserving water and collecting our own water.

Continue Reading

Crop rotation is a term many new plot holders find a bit daunting and something most veteran plot holders swear by. Either way, it’s something which needs some thought. If you’ve set aside some of your plot for perennials, next you can put some thought into rotation of your crops.

You’ll find once you’ve decided what you’ll be growing on your plot, odds are they’ll all require their own nutritional needs and this is where crop rotation can help. Aside from this, educating yourself on crop rotation will help prevent your plot from disease and pest build up while grouping crops together which have similar needs in terms of what nutrition they need and you’ll soon have some very healthy and fertile soil. If you ask any fellow plot holders who follow crop rotation and you’ll find they usually follow a 3 or 4 year rotation plan, so below we’ve outlined a rotation plan based on 4 beds over 3 years. The below is only a guide, feel free to adapt to what you want to grow, just keep an eye on crop groups like brassicas, alliums etc so you can try and sick to the group type.

Year One – First, make sure your soil is enriched and healthy by adding your compost.

Bed One

  • Spring/Summer – Plant your tomatoes, potatoes and courgettes.
  • Autumn – Plan your alliums like onions, garlic and leeks.

Bed Two

  • Spring/Summer – Plant your root vegetables like carrots, parsnips, beetroot along with spinach, parsley and chard.
  • Autumn – Mix in Green manure to help break up soil.

Bed Three

  • Spring/Summer – Add your compost before planting your brassicas like cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli.
  • Autumn – Plant your winter brassicas like kale and sprouts.

Bed Four

  • Spring/Summer – Keep it simple with peas and beans.
  • Autumn – Don’t plant anything, but lime the soil if you plan to plant brassicas again next year.

 

Year Two

Bed One

  • Spring/Summer – This year plant your beans and peas here.
  • Autumn – Lime the soil after harvesting your beans and peas and leave.

Bed Two

  • Spring/Summer – Add some good compost and plant your tomatoes, potatoes and courgettes.
  • Autumn – Plant your alliums like your onions, garlic and shallots.

Bed Three

  • Spring/Summer – Plant your roots like celeriac, carrots, beetroot, parsnips and your spinach, chard etc.
  • Autumn – Mix in green manure to break up soil.

Bed Four

  • Spring/Summer – Plant your summer brassicas like cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and radishes and turnips.
  • Autumn – Plant your winter brassicas like kale and sprouts.

Year Three

Bed One

  • Spring/Summer – Add your compost before planting your summer brassicas like cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and radishes and turnips.
  • Autumn – Plant your winter brassicas like kale and sprouts.

Bed Two

  • Spring/Summer – This year plant your beans and peas here.
  • Autumn – Lime the soil after harvesting your beans and peas and leave.

Bed Three

  • Spring/Summer – Add your compost before planting your tomatoes, potatoes and courgettes.
  • Autumn – Plant your alliums like your onions, garlic and shallots.

Bed Four

  • Spring/Summer – Plant your roots like celeriac, carrots, beetroot, parsnips and your spinach, chard etc.
  • Autumn – Mix in green manure to break up soil.

Take a look at all of our allotment tips and tricks here.

 

CAAA (Colchester Avenue Allotment Association) newsletter — Autumn 2019

CAAA cheap seeds scheme 2019/20 – HALF-PRICE seeds from Dobies available to all CAAA plot-holders.

This year we are operating a seed ordering scheme enabling plot-holders to buy Dobies seeds at 50% of the normal price. This offer includes disease-resistant varieties and organic seeds, flowers and vegetables: seeds are NEW not old stock. Other items in the catalogue are also available at 15% off.

The Dobies scheme is easy to use.

  • Anyone who wants to take part can pick up the 160 page colour catalogue plus a special order form;
  • Complete the order form at your leisure and return it to me with payment, including £1.99 postage for any number of packets of seeds.
  • After Christmas I’ll start sending our orders and money to Dobies;
  • Your seeds will then be delivered directly TO YOUR OWN ADDRESS
  • The sooner you order, the sooner you’ll receive your seeds.

Pick up a catalogue and order form from the allotment shop, or from any committee member. I shall be available to distribute catalogues and forms and/or take in orders and money as follows:

  • Saturday November 9th 10 am to 12.30 – Meeting room next door to the shop on the allotment site
  • Sunday December 15th 1.30 to 4pm – Sainsbury’s Café in Colchester Avenue
  • Saturday January 11th 10am to 12.30 – Upstairs in Penylan Library
  • Sunday February 16th 1.30 to 4 – Sainsbury’s Café in Colchester Avenue
    Caroline Joll (committee member, plot 32B)

Site improvements

After much detective work, digging and laying of some new pipes over the summer we’ve slashed the amount of water we lose through leaks. Last year around 8,000 litres was gushing into the ground every 12 hours. We’ve now reduced that to just 300 litres and we plan to tackle those remaining leaks too. We all pay for the water through our annual subs. So stopping most of the leaks means we have more to invest in site improvements in future.

We’ve also installed a new water trough on the road from the Dorchester Avenue gate to help plotholders in that area and fixed faults in other troughs. If you notice or suspect a leak, let site manager Roger Kay know or email colchesteravenueaa@gmail.com.

As usual, we’ve turned the water off over the winter when nature normally provides more than enough rain. We’ll put the water back on in the spring.

Roads and scrap metal

We plan to take advantage of the quieter winter months to repair the roads near the shop and fill in the worst of the potholes. Tarmac is expensive, so we’re only able to repair the worst affected and busiest roads on the site.

The new storage bay (pictured opposite plots 118 and 119) for scrap metal will help us keep the site tidier and raise money. It’s also good for the environment as any metal you leave here gets recycled.

The new general waste storage bay is only a last resort for rubbish already onsite. Ideally we should all take any general waste home or to the Council dump at Lamby Way. It costs nearly £300 every time we hire a skip to get rid of general waste – money we could otherwise spend on site improvements.
Roger Kay & John Sanders

Shop, compost and manure

It’s the time of year to spread compost and manure on cleared beds ready for the next growing season. Large bags of compost are available to buy in the site shop Saturday and Sunday lunchtimes from 12 till 2 pm. Val also sells onion sets, garlic, broad bean seeds and lime among other items.

Plotholders often ask for details of manure suppliers. Two who deliver to the site are farmer John (a trailer or skip of manure for £50) on 07816 356645 and Joe at Woodlands Compost who supplies organic horse manure at £5 a bag (minimum 50 bags). Contact Joe at 01749 870797 (eve), 07553 765808 (day) or email jbtreeandgroundworks@icloud.com.
John Sanders, plot 24a

Grapevine

Saturday courses – For information about the “Timely tips for successful growing” sessions see the site notice-boards, phone 029 2087 2030 or enrol online at www.cardiff.gov.uk/learn.

Wasps — Hopefully, no-one is plagued by wasps at this time of year, but if you find a nest in spring, the Council will remove it free of charge. Email colchesteravenueaa@gmail.com saying where the nest is and we will contact the Council for you.

Bug Hunt — Looking ahead to next year, CAAA chairman Julian Goss has arranged another bug hunt for the children and grandchildren of plot holders on the morning of Sunday May 17.

Where home is a compost bin

By ‘5 a day’
People with a compost bin on their plot often don’t realise how important it can be for wild life. All that decaying plant material is food, and also a habitat, for many creatures that decompose our compost and make it usable on the plot, such as earthworms, slugs, snails, woodlice, springtails and millipedes.

These in turn attract animals that eat them, like centipedes, spiders and beetles. There are up to 300 species of beetle that favour compost bins. Beetles may live in the garden as adults, but they often started out as larvae in the compost bin.

Birds, hedgehogs, frogs, toads and shrews all eat insects that are found in the compost heap. And a recent study in Bristol found that gardens with a compost bin were twice as likely to contain slow worms. This helps, because slow worms love to eat slugs!


To attract wild life, it’s best to put the compost bin on bare earth rather than a hard surface, so that wild life can more easily get in and out. And it might be best not to turn the compost, which would disturb the larger creatures.

Newsletter contact: johnsanders@clara.co.uk
CAAA website http://www.caaa.org.uk

HALF-PRICE seeds from Dobies available to all Colchester Avenue plot-holders

This year we are operating a new seed ordering scheme which will enable all plot-holders to buy any Dobies seeds at 50% of the normal price. Nb this offer includes disease-resistant varieties and organic seeds, flowers as well as vegetables, and seeds are new not old stock. Other items in the catalogue are also available at 15% off.

The Dobies scheme is easy to use.

  • Anyone who wants to take part can pick up the 160 page colour catalogue plus a special order form;
  • Complete the order form at your leisure and return it to me with payment, including £1.99 postage for any number of packets of seeds.
  • After Christmas I’ll start sending our orders and money to Dobies;
  • Your seeds will then be delivered directly TO YOUR OWN ADDRESS
  • The sooner you complete your order, the sooner you’ll receive your seeds.

Pick up a catalogue and order form from the allotment shop, or from any committee member. You can also view the catalogue here on the Dobies website (50% off all catalogue seed prices), but you’ll still need to pick up the special discount form.

I shall be available to distribute catalogues and forms and/or take in orders and money as follows:

Saturday November 9th  10 am to 12.30 Meeting room next door to the shop on the allotment site
Sunday December 15th 1.30 to 4pm Sainsbury’s Café in Colchester Avenue
Saturday January 11th 10am to 12.30 Upstairs in Penylan Library
Sunday February 16th 1.30 to 4 Sainsbury’s Café in Colchester Avenue

If you’d like to contact Caroline for any further information, please complete the form below:

Shoots and roots by Julian Goss

In July CAAA I spoke to Year 2 pupils at Stacey Road Primary School. Among their questions were: “How many different vegetables do you grow?” and “What does an allotment smell like?” Everything you can think of — although they didn’t always listen to the answers!

Later that week Craig Smith welcomed 30 pupils from Year 5 to share the joys of his allotment. This included a massively popular Bug Hunt organised by the RSPB. The following day Year 2 did the same, with equal success. The pupils loved it and are keen to do it again. The main teacher behind the initiative, Murium Sadiq, is already planning next year’s visit.

This is the third time we have hosted this event. As before our gratitude goes to Craig, who has done so much to enthuse a new generation of gardeners about the pleasures to be found in the natural world.

ooo000ooo

AGM report by John Sanders

Almost 40 people attended the CAAA annual general meeting on April 24th (held in Penylan Bowls Club) and agreed to continue the level 3 Self-Management Agreement for another year. We are the only allotment site in Cardiff with such an agreement. Level 3 means we have more independence in how we run the site, but we have to pay the water bills.

Leaks: Not surprisingly a big topic of discussion was tackling leaks so that we can keep the cost of water down and invest more in the site. However, locating the leaks isn’t easy since there isn’t an accurate plan of where the pipes run. So it helps to have a water butt or two on our plots. Even if you don’t have a shed roof to collect water, an open butt will fill up over the winter.

Security: Our allotments are more secure than many sites in Cardiff, but security was discussed at length at the AGM. CCTV cameras aren’t a practical option (think about cost, vulnerability, who’s going to monitor them? privacy issues, etc). But we are taking steps to improve the boundaries with the limited funds available. As ever, the advice is don’t lock sheds or leave anything valuable on our plots.

Money: Financial information omitted from the online newsletter. To see the financial information, please see the original newsletter emailed to all members,

High demand: We shouldn’t exaggerate the negatives, though. Colchester Avenue allotments are very popular. Around 40 people are on the waiting list eager to start digging, weeding and planting. Thanks to everyone who’s joined the work parties removing rubbish to make challenging plots more presentable to newcomers.

ooo000ooo

The Greenfly by ‘5 a day’

Along with the blackfly, the greenfly is one of the common aphids that hits our plants in the spring. Greenflies suck sap from the tenderest growth on new plants, very often colonising the underside of the leaves. They sometimes carry diseases and viruses which they inject into our plants. Worse still, in the summer females produce young that already have babies inside them. No males needed at this point.

If a major infestation builds up, female aphids will produce young which have wings, enabling them to bother your neighbours’ plants. In the autumn the female aphids need males to produce eggs that may well survive the winter and start the whole cycle off again.

Aphids have lots of natural predators — ladybirds, hoverfly larvae, lacewing larvae, parasitic wasps and blue tits. But if you want to step in, just squash them, or spray them with diluted washing-up liquid. They don’t breathe through their mouths, but through pores in their skin. The soap clogs up the pores and suffocates them. Who needs pesticides?

CAAA website http://www.caaa.org.uk

The Health and Safety Executive are running a survey until the end of May 2019 asking gardeners and allotment holders to anonymously let them know about their purchase, use, storage and disposal of pesticides. As mentioned the survey is anonymous and wants to encourage people to give honest answers to get a better understanding about how people are using pesticides and is run every three years.

You can view results of their previous surveys here and if you want to complete the latest survey about pesticides then head here. And the HSE will give you the option when completing the survey to go into a draw to win one of ten £50 National Garden Gift Vouchers.*

 

* The draw for the garden vouchers will be run independently by the Horticultural Trades Association, who will issue the vouchers.

COLCHESTER AVENUE ALLOTMENTS ASSOCIATION

Minutes of the Annual General Meeting held on April 24th 2019 in the Penylan Club

Present: R Kay [400] (Convener), R Williams [59], V Donnelly [75], S Place [3], M Wass [135], S Finch [167], C Joll [32B], A. Judge (153B), P Thurlbeck [309B], C. Pritchard (137A), J Wheeler (140), N. Drew (8), G. Drew (13), E + T Stephens [136B], K Boddington [79B], E + S Kay [19], P Watson [48], S Goddard [67A], C Campagli [60A], J Sanders + S Aubrey [24A], Ian McCormick [119B/118B], K + J Shine [117A], D Harris [412B], S David [174], G Sims [33B], A Hare [411], D Hare [181], G Baezoni + A Guy [ 80B/ 83B], K Oyston [125B]D + J Butterick [27B], J Witts [144], P Barratt [402], A Jones [16]

Apologies: J Goss [79] W. Morris [319A], V Finch [56], G. Brady [57], E + P Atherfold [4], J Richmond [1B], L Cronin [14B], S Carter [129A], A Price [112A],E + L Hazell [73B], D Margan [61A+B], N + M Jones [410], K Brock [304], S Callaghan [27A], S Taherian [40], E Dare [127A], A Williams [17A+B], D Sims [159B], R Crodon [152B], T Christoldo [116A], N Albrow [22A], S Grubb [23A], S Ansell [ 64B], H Karaman [33A], C Al-Khanchi [183], K Nicholas [209], A + J Herman [128A], Z Clegg [103B], G Johns [70B], J Hughes [155A], L Jones

Welcome
The Convener welcomed plot holders to the 20th AGM and reminded members that only plot holders could register to vote.

2. Apologies – above

3. Minutes of the 2018 AGM held on 20th April 2018
These were agreed to be a correct record and were signed by the Convener.

4. Matters arising
None was raised.

5. Renewal of LMA for 2019 – 2020
Convener explained the principle of the Self-Management Agreement. We are signed up to Level 3, which means we get a higher income from the Council, but we have to pay for our water.
Vic Donnelly was invited to explain the situation with the water supply as there has been a problem with the supply over the past few months.
Vic explained that the water system on site is the property and responsibility of the Council. We have a responsibility to maintain the troughs, the Council for the underground water pipes.
Unfortunately, there are no records of the position of the pipes, but over time, Vic has been able to plot where they are.
Last year, there was a very serious leak, leading to Welsh Water issuing a warning to the Council that, unless the leak was repaired, they would be fined. This was eventually found and a contractor was called in by the Council to carry out a repair.
At the time, Vic was in the process of installing valves so that areas of the site could be isolated.
A further leak w, significantly smaller than the first one, was then detected. Welsh Water decided the water had to be turned off. It has since been re-instated.
The Allotments Officer visited the site, after numerous requests over a 6-month period, and, with the contractor, agreed to the fitting of isolating valves. Unfortunately, these were not the type Vic had requested – to which he could have attached meters.
Vic has continued to try to find the source of the leak and has carried out repairs on some troughs, which do deteriorate over the winter months.
Currently, water is turned on for some hours each day to ensure the troughs are kept topped up.
Vic emphasised the importance of harvesting rainwater on EVERY plot, as it is likely that using drinking water to water gardens is unlikely to meet with approval in the future.

In view of this, our water supply is a big issue in terms of our budget. If we remain on L3 for the LMA, we continue to be responsible for paying the water bill. However, if we do so, we do get a higher grant from the Council and we are able to control the water supply, giving us a chance to identify and rectify the current leak.
If we went to L2, the Council would be responsible for the water bills, but they would almost certainly turn the water off.
The Convenor pointed out that, if the members felt strongly that we should revert to L2, we would have to give the Council 3 months notice. The Convenor told the meeting that this would be kept under review.

The recommendation of the Committee would be to renew the LMA on L3 for 2019-20, UNLESS we are unable to solve the problem, in which case we would seek the approval of members to return to L2.
There was unanimous agreement from the members at the AGM that the LMA be renewed for 2019-20 and remain on L3.

6. Chairman’s Report
In the absence of the Chairman, the report was presented by Roger Williams.
Thanks were extended to members of the Committee for all the work done on the site and for the various roles they have undertaken.
Thanks were also extended to those plot holders who have helped with work parties, and to Craig Smith in particular for all his willing work around the site as well as with school parties who have visited during the year.
Further visits have been arranged with schools, as well as a bug hunt in May.

7. Site Secretary’s report
The Secretary told the meeting of her intention to step down from the Committee at the next AGM.
She also thanked the members for their support of the idea of reducing the size of plots, when large plots become vacant. This has been a resounding success and has increased the number of plots being let.
She also thanked those plot holders who regularly attend work parties. As a result, the site is looking far better than it has been, even 12 months ago.
Roger Kay did raise a point – that when plots are cleared, a lot of carpet is often found. This is banned by the Council, is heavy to dispose of and toxic for the soil. He asked all members to point this out to other plot holders if they see it being brought on to the site.

8. Teasurer’s Report
Not available online, please ask a committee member if you’d like a copy of the treasurers report.

The audited accounts were unanimously accepted by the meeting.

9. Shop Report
Roger Kay presented this report in the absence of Val Finch.
The shop is in profit, thanks to all the plot holders who support it.
Val takes in surplus plants, which are sold in the shop, the money from these sales go to the site funds.
Unfortunately, such donations left outside the shop during the week do disappear. PLEASE take any such donations to Craig Smith (Plot 412) and he will pass them on to Val at the weekend.

10. Convener for 2019
Clause P3 of the constitution of the Association requires that a Convener chairs the AGM, chosen by plot holders attending the AGM. Roger Williams proposed that Roger Kay be appointed for 2020.
The meeting agreed unanimously that Roger Kay should serve as the Convener for the 2020 AGM.

11. Elections
After checking the nomination forms, the Convener declared that there were no other nominations, therefore the current Committee would continue
Chair:- Julian Goss
Secretary:- Angharad Jones
Treasurer:- Steven Place
Storekeeper:- Val Finch
Site Manager:- Roger Kay
Plot Letting:- Roger Williams
Webmaster:- Gavin Sims
Member posts on the Executive Committee:-
Vic Donnelly, Sue Finch and Jeff Witts (Caroline Joll – co-opted member)

12. Appointment of Auditor
Mohamad Moulani was proposed as Auditor. This was unanimously agreed.

13. AOB
• Intrusion on the site –
1 chicken was killed, 2 were damaged after being kicked.
Sheds were also vandalised.
The advice is NOT TO LOCK your shed and DO NOT leave any power tools or mechanical tools as they are stolen and sold. A water trough was also damaged.
The Police responded quickly and came to the site – scenes of crime took away a wrecking bar, which had been used to damage the trough
• Theft on a different occasion – Fruit trees and bushes removed from the ground. There was a discussion around using cameras These can be stolen Who would maintain and monitor the cameras?
• Jeff Witts extended thanks to Sharron David (Plot 174) on behalf of everyone on site, for all the work she has done clearing the edge of the access road.

• Gavin Sims explained what he has done on the new website. He handed out leaflets to explain

• If you want to join the new forums on the website, contact Gavin (gavin@caaa.org.uk) to obtain a logon

• Caroline Joll was co-opted onto the Committee

The meeting closed at 8.30pm and the Convener thanked the members for attending.

COLCHESTER AVENUE ALLOTMENTS ASSOCIATION

Minutes of the Annual General Meeting held on April 20th 2018 in the Penylan Club

Present: J Goss [79] (Convener), R Williams [59], V Donnelly [75], R Kay [400],S Finch [167], S. Thomas [176A], C Joll [32B], P Thurlbeck [309B], C Smith [413], D Smith, V T Goss [79], W. Morris (319A), L Lyons (142B), C. Pritchard (137A), J Wheeler (140), C. Nurse + E White (107A), N. Drew (8), G. Drew (13), E + T Stephens [136B], A + J Houlston-Clark [318A], D Harris [412], K Boddington [79B], E + P Atherfold [4], R + N Moss [156A], S Kay [19], P Watson [48], S Goddard [67A], S Ansell + M Kelly [64B], P Sutton [106B], C Campagli [60A], J Sanders [24A], A Price [112A], A Jones [16]

Apologies: S Place [3], M Wass [135], V Finch (56), G. Brady (57), V Wright + G Wright [113B + 126A], H Burrows [121], A Tamburello [86], A. Judge (153B), C Stock [23B+24B], P Codron [159C], Z Khan [25], F Gerrard [164]

Welcome
The Convener welcomed plot holders to the 19th AGM and reminded members that only plot holders could register to vote.

2. Apologies – above

3. Minutes of the 2017 AGM held on 7th April 2017
These were agreed to be a correct record and were signed by the Convener.

4. Matters arising
None was raised.

5. Renewal of LMA for 2018 – 2019
Convener explained the principle of the Self-Management Agreement. We are signed up to Level 3, which means we get a higher income from the Council, but we have to pay for our water. The recommendation of the Committee would be to renew the LMA for 2018-19. There was unanimous agreement from the members at the AGM that the LMA be renewed for 2018-19

6. Chairman’s Report
Julian Goss was acting as Convenor for the AGM as Roger Kay had been unavailable for a few months so JG had taken over the role for this meeting. His report was attached to the documents sent out before the meeting and rather than go over them, he invited the members to ask any questions. One question concerned Stacey Road Primary school, and whether they were likely to visit the site again. Julian was confident that this was highly likely as it had been so successful last year, largely due to Craig Smith’s input with the children. Sue Ansell [Plot 64B] offered her help with future visits.

7. Site Secretaries Report
Angharad explained the process of plot inspections, consisting of 3 steps – an initial letter of concern, formal letter to cultivate or quit, eviction notice from the Council. There is a period of 4 weeks between each step. When an eviction notice is sent from the Council, the plot holder has a further 4 weeks in which to appeal the notice and show that some improvement has been made. Photographic evidence of the plot is taken when the formal C/Q notice is sent, and also when the Council issues an eviction notice. It’s a long process, which is frustrating for the Committee and for the neighbours of the neglected plots. AJ also thanked Roger Williams for his continued work, organizing plot-letting paperwork and to other members of the committee who do plot letting duty. No questions were asked from the floor.

8. Shopkeeper’s Report
Val Finch was unable to attend the meeting. Julian apologized on her behalf.

9. Treasurer’s Report
Not available online, please ask a committee member if you’d like a copy of the treasurers report.

10. Convener for 2019
Clause P3 of the constitution of the Association requires that a Convener chairs the AGM, chosen by plot holders attending the AGM. Julian Goss proposed that Roger Kay be appointed for 2019. The meeting agreed unanimously that Roger Kay should serve as the Convener for the 2019 AGM.

11. Elections
After checking the nomination forms, the Convener declared that there were no other nominations, therefore the current Committee would continue
Chair:- Julian Goss
Secretary:- Angharad Jones
Treasurer:- Steven Place
Storekeeper:- Valerie Finch
Site Manager:- Roger Kay
Plot Letting:- Roger Williams
Webmaster:- Simon Thomas
Member posts on the Executive Committee:- Mattew Wass, Vic Donnelly, and Sue Finch

12. Appointment of Auditor
Mohamad Moulani was proposed as Auditor. This was unanimously agreed.

13. AOB
a) Sue Ansell [Plot 64B] – concerned about the use of chemicals on site. She had to leave her plot twice
i) when weedkiller was being used
ii) when weeds were being killed using burning paraffin JG explained that the path between plots are the responsibility of both plot holders. He suggested that:
i) If you want to use weedkillers, you must discuss this with your neighbours
ii) Many plot holders try to garden organically and have the right to do this. We must therefore, be sensitive to our neighbours.
b) Rubbish is accumulating near the metal dump with plastic pots and other plastic blowing down the road near the dumping area. This should be taken home. JG explained that we use skips, which are expensive.
c) Julia Houlston-Clark offered to help the Association apply for money from the Big Lottery, people and places grant.
d) Bees – a question re hives on site. JG explained the history of Council rules. Also the role of CAHA. To keep bees on site, a plot holder must be properly qualified and also garden a plot which is designated as appropriate by the Council. Chickens – the legislation allows plot holders to keep chickens, but they are a heavy responsibility and need tending twice a day. This commitment seems to put many people off.
e) Question regarding clearing the road by your plot. This is encouraged!
f) Query about the demolition of Howardian – the old school. Likely to be after September. Houses are planned for the site. RASW said we should be eligible to apply for a Section 106 grant.

The meeting closed at 8.20pm and the Convener thanked the members for attending.