Autumn 2018 Newsletter

Editorial

Bug-hunts.
We hope to organise a bug-hunt for plot holders’ children (and grandchildren) on a Sunday next summer, having held a couple of successful bug-hunts earlier this year for visiting primary schools. It’s a great way to teach young people about some of the wonders of nature. In the meantime, numbers of natural pollinators are in decline. This is because of loss of  habitat, and also the use of dangerous pesticides. Gardeners can do a little to turn the tide by growing flowers, as many of us do. Ideally they should be varieties in which nectar and pollen are easily accessible, single blooms rather than doubles. Every bit helps.

Fly-tipping.
A tiny minority of plot holders persist in bringing carpets on site, and even domestic rubbish This is not only anti-social, but contrary to the Council’s letting conditions. It also happens to be illegal. Please take rubbish home. I have it on good authority that the Council will employ people to come to your home and collect rubbish every week.

Cheap seeds.
(Please see form attached to this email) Seeds are pretty expensive these days, so it’s a pleasure to announce that we can buy Mr. Fothergill’s seeds at half price. Please contact Matt on tel. no. 07709 959585 for a seed order form. Cash only.

Pathways.
There seem to be a bit of confusion regarding pathways. There has to be a path between every plot and all of its neighbours, the path has to be kept clear, and it is the joint responsibility of the neighbours on each side of the path to keep it in good order. If you have any queries on this score, please contact Roger Williams on tel. no. 02920 492934.

Strimmers and other equipment.
It is possible to obtain the use of certain machines on site. There is a charge for this, to cover maintenance and fuel. Plot holders also have to put down a deposit, which will be returned when the machinery is returned in a clean and undamaged condition.

Annual General Meeting.
Our AGM will be on Friday 26 April, at the Penylan Club. Put the date in your diary now.

Shop opening hours. 
Val says she doesn’t do much trade on a Saturday, so she is experimenting with opening only on a Sunday, from 12.00 till 2.00.

Julian Goss.

Nitrogen-Fixing Vegetables.
It has long been believed by many gardeners that growing legumes fixes nitrogen in the soil, which helps crops planted in the same spot the following year to flourish. This was thought to be especially true of leafy crops, since nitrogen is essential for leaf production. Which? Magazine tested this theory last year by growing plots of runner beans, climbing French beans, dwarf French beans, broad beans, mangetout, garden peas, sugarsnap peas and winter tares (a green manure in the legume family). Two other plots were left fallow. Both were rotovated this spring, and one of them had Growmore added. The Growmore plot produced the highest yield, around twice as much as any of the other plots. There was very little difference between the bean plots and the fallow plot, where no fertilizer was applied, nor legumes grown. The plots where the peas and the green manure were sown produced only a tiny amount of produce. None of this means that we should stop using green manures to suppress weeds, however.

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