Spring 2017 Newsletter

Editorial.

As you know, our AGM decided not to completely ban the dumping of unwanted material.

Scrap metal can still be dumped at the back of the car park opposite Plot 121. Hard wood prunings can be left to rot down UNDER THE TREES, opposite Plot 121, and behind the car park, on Plot 10.

Soft prunings, weeds etc. need to be composted, taken to Wedal Road, or taken home for the domestic refuse collection. The roots of perennial weeds (bindweed, horse tails etc.) can be submerged in water for six weeks. This will kill them, and the resulting liquid makes good plant food. (the same can be done with comfrey).

Getting started on your plot.

On Saturday, May 27, CAAA will be hosting the first of a series of Saturday training courses for allotmenteers, taking place in our Meeting Room. Organised by Cardiff Adult Community Learning, the session will last from 10 till 2 (4 hours, including a 30 minute break). The cost will be £20 for the full fee, £15 for Concessions.

The course will help you to:

*Learn about you soil, what it needs and how to improve it.

*Keep weeds at bay.

*Start your Summer crops.

*Draw up a simple growing plan.

*Start making your own compost.

*Conserve water on the plot.

*Get the most from your allotment—throughout the year!

To book a place, contact John Hobson, Community Education Officer, on 02920 631144 or JHobson@cardiff.gov.uk

Some problems with apples.

Bitter pit. Tiny brown specks appear in the flesh of the apple, making it unpleasant to eat. This is caused by calcium deficiency, which results from having too little water. Heavy-cropping trees, and those with large fruit, are most susceptible. So thinning the crop may help.

Capsid bug. Raised brown or yellow bumps appear on the apple’s skin. The tree is not harmed. The apple can be eaten after the bumps are cut off.

Brown rot. Fruits become soft and brown, with raised white spots on them. Rot attacks damaged fruit, so remove fruit damaged by wasps, birds or hailstones before the infection can strike. Dispose of infected fruit.

Apple scab. Leaves develop raised grey patches. Fruit sometimes develop scab patches. Try to encourage air circulation around the foliage by regular pruning. Collect up and dispose of infected leaves to avoid the disease spreading.

Winter moth. In early spring, tiny yellow-green caterpillars feed on the foliage. They also damage small fruits. Later the fruits become distorted, with deep cracks in them. The female is wingless, and climbs the tree between the end of autumn and winter. Putting sticky grease-bands around the trunk can stop her getting to the foliage to lay her eggs.

Codling moth. Small white, brown-headed caterpillars feed inside the apple, leaving a tunnel filled with their droppings. The caterpillar’s exit hole is clearly visible. Apples usually go on to suffer from other problems, such as brown rot. You can hang pheromone traps to kill the male moths in early May, or spray trunks and branches in September or October with a biological control such as Nemasys Fruit and Veg Protection. Destroy affected apples.

Fireblight. The blossom suddenly wilts and dies shortly after opening. The shoot withers and dies. If you peel back the bark, the wood will be a red-brown colour. Prune out and destroy all the affected growth. If this is done soon enough the tree might be saved.

Leaf miner. White and brown wiggly lines develop in the leaves. This has no affect on the fruit.

Report of AGM held on April 7th 2017 at the Penylan Bowls Club
The meeting was well attended, with 37 attendees, and 20 apologies.
The Executive Committee for 2017 remains unchanged, as there were no other nominations.
Chair:- Julian Goss
Secretary:- Angharad Jones
Treasurer:- Steven Place
Storekeeper:- Valerie Finch
5 member posts Roger Kay, Mattew Wass , Vic Donnell, Roger Williams, Sue Wilshere, Simon Thomas

The Chairman explained that the role of Site Secretary, previously filled by Roger Williams, had been divided into 4 areas of responsibility. Angharad Jones was the designated Secretary, responsible for minutes, letters and the point of contact with the Council. Roger Kay has taken on the role of Site Manager, Roger Williams organizes and co-ordinates plot letting and Julian Goss attends meetings with the Parks Department and CAHA.

Both Julian Goss and Angharad Jones thanked Roger Williams for the fantastic work he had done over so many years.

Angharad Jones explained that the Association is now responsible for inspecting plots. These inspections are carried out on a regular basis throughout the year, with plot holders being informed of any concerns regarding a lack of cultivation or the accumulation of rubbish on their plot. The Council retains the power of eviction – which is supported by photographic evidence taken during plot inspections.

The shop had a difficult year with an attempted burglary, which resulted in the renewal of the roof, and an invasion of rats, which caused significant loss of stock. Both problems were sorted. Val Finch thanked everyone for the support shown to the shop.

In the Treasurer’s absence, the Chairman thanked Mohammed Moulani for auditing the accounts again. The meeting agreed that he be appointed auditor for the next financial year.

Roger Kay, the Site Manager described the work done on site. He explained the importance of water conservation, as the Association is now responsible, under the Local Management Agreement, for paying the water bill. He was clear that hoses must NOT be connected to any mains trough – they can only be connected to containers in which rainwater had been collected.

He explained that any experiences with intruders must be reported to the Police or via 101.

The new container will be used as a Meeting Room. He asked that, if anyone had any suggestions for uses, to pass those suggestions on to members of the committee.

He explained the importance of Work Parties and announced that Refreshments will be available in future for those participating in work parties.

A large part of the meeting was devoted to a discussion of the draft resolution regarding dumping on site. This resolution was modified and passed by a clear majority:

“We resolve, therefore, that in future, all rubbish that plot holders wish to dispose of, must be taken off site by THEM – excluding green waste and scrap metal.”

From now on, plot holders must compost as much green waste as possible. To help with this, it is hoped that workshops on compost making will be held.

Any scrap metal must be put in the designated area at the back of the car park next to the A48. Some green waste may be put behind the bank next to the same car park as well as behind the car park near Plot 8.

ON NO ACCOUNT should any rubbish/green waste be left on any car park.

Roger Kay was re-elected as Convener for the 2018 AGM.

Colchester Avenue Allotments Association (CAAA) is a registered charity. Charity no. 1092014.
http://www.caaa.org.uk

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